Resistance of advanced cassava breeding clones to.

During November 2004, veinal chlorosis on mature cassava leaves, typical of cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), was observed at Mukono in central Uganda. Five out of 11 cultivars at the site showed CBSD symptoms (incidence range 4 to 64%). In a survey of farmers' fields, CBSD was observed in Wakiso and Mukono districts. Incidence of cassava mosaic disease was also recorded and averaged 60%.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

The symptoms, similar to the cassava brown streak disease described in East Africa, suggested the possible involvement of cassava brown streak viruses (Mbanzibwa et al., 2011). The expanding cassava brown streak disease epidemic in East Africa is caused by two ipomoviruses, Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV; Monger et al., 2010) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV; Winter et al., 2010).

CBSUV - Cassava Brown Streak Uganda Virus.

In November 2013, symptoms of yellowing on leaves and brown necrotic rot on tuberous roots were observed on different cassava landraces in Dembeni on Mayotte Island, a French Overseas Department in the southwest Indian Ocean. The causal pathogen was identified as Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) based on RT-PCR analyses.A new distribution map is provided for Ugandan cassava brown streak virus. Potyviridae: Ipomovirus. Hosts: cassava (Manihot esculenta). Information is given on the geographical distribution in Africa (Burundi, Congo Democratic Republic, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda).Background: Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) has a viral aetiology and is caused by viruses belonging to the genus Ipomovirus (family Potyviridae), Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV). Molecular and serological methods are available for detection, discrimination and quantification of cassava.


Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) belonging to the genus Ipomovirus of the family Potyviridae (Monger et al., 2001b). The causal agent was graft- (Storey, 1936) and mechanically-transmissible from cassava to a number of herbaceous hosts (Lister, 1959). It was suggested previously that CBSV was insect transmitted and that the.WYMV Wheat yellow mosaic virus Keywords: Cassava brown streak disease, Cassava brown streak virus, Ugandan cassava brown streak virus, complete genomes, genetic variability, HAM1, recombination, selection pressure, Manihot esculenta, Manihot glaziovii, Virus diagnostics and reservoirs.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

The disease is caused by two viruses within the Potyviridae family: Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), which both encode atypical Ham1 proteins with highly conserved inosine triphosphate (ITP) pyrophosphohydrolase (ITPase) domains. ITPase proteins are widely encoded by plant, animal, and archaea.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by Cassava brown streak Uganda virus (CBSUV) and Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), is of new epidemic importance to cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) production in East Africa, and an emerging threat to the crop in Central and West Africa. This study demonstrates that at least one of these two ipomoviruses, CBSUV, can be efficiently controlled.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

Invertebrate Virus Subcommittee 2008.001-004,6I.A.v3.Aparavirus 2008.001I create new genus in the family Dicistroviridae 2008.002I name the new genus Aparavirus 2008.003I assign 4 existing species (Acute bee paralysis virus, Kashmir bee virus, Solenopsis invicta virus-1, Taura syndrome virus) to new genus and create 1 additional species.

Which insects transmit cassava viruses? A pump-prime.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

Cassava is a major staple food for about 800 million people in the tropics and sub-tropical regions of the world. Production of cassava is significantly hampered by cassava brown streak disease (CBSD), caused by Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV). The disease.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

Cassava brown streak disease is a virus disease that damages the starch-bearing tuberous roots of cassava. The disease is endemic in the coastal lowlands of Eastern Africa such as Uganda, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, Malawi and Mozambique.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

About the disease Cassava brown streak virus disease (CBSD) is a damaging disease of cassava plants, especially troublesome in Eastern Africa. The chief vector of CBSD is an insect, the whitefly.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV), which do not result in the expression of any new proteins. 2 2.2 Intellectual Property ownership of the novel trait TheCBSD resistance trait of cassava event 4046 is not licensed and is royalty free. The Virus.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

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Progress in screening cassava genotypes for resistance to.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

Cassava, a staple food crop for residents of Eastern and Northern Uganda, has been plagued by cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), a devastating plant disease that destroys the starchy tuber while it’s still in the ground. Cassava crop failures have led to famine and economic hardship in the afflicted areas.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

We have recently reported the construction of Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV) and Ugandan cassava brown streak virus (UCBSV) infectious clones (IC), which can be used to gain insights into the functions of viral proteins and sequences associated with symptom development. In this study, we perform the first reporter gene tagging of a CBSV IC, with the insertion of green fluorescent protein.

Ugandan cassava brown streak virus

Cassava brown streak disease (CBSD) was previously thought to be caused by either one or a complex of two viruses (then designated Cassava brown streak-associated virus and Cassava brown streak virus) (Lennon et al., 1985).